p b t d t_ d_ c k g q G ? m M n n_ N B R 2 2_ f v f s z S 3 s_ z_ J x V X 6 # h H 9 r r_ j 4 l l_ 5 7 i y W u U I Y e o @ E & 8 O a A 0 Q | ! F T b d g G ; w w K P C Z / % (See the consonant chart) {  } ' , : | . {  } ^h > < + - [] $ ^w ^j ^V ^ L ` ~ ^n ^l ^ [] [] [] [`] [``] [<] [>] [+] [-] [^+] [_+] [] [/] [\] f[N] [s] 9[z] *[ww] *[] [] [] = (Already defined in the basic diacritic chart) " \ [@] [] [~] [] [#] [_] [^] (.) (..) (...) [f] [ff] [p] [pp] [allegro] [lento] [crescendo], [ralentando], etc. [>] [<] () ( ) () ( ) ^= [h^] *[?] *[?V], *[?Pl] *[?Pl,vls] ( ) (( )) ! *
SMACKIE Makes ASCII Characters for Keen IPA Enthusiasts



SMACKIE is a transcription of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) into ASCII, designed to provide a more aesthetically pleasing alternative to SAMPA. To achieve this, SMACKIE goes beyond the standard 7-bit range, but still remains within the ISO-8859-1 region of the Unicode table, so it should be usable in most places/situations. It attempts to imitate the look of IPA whenever possible, but falls back on logic when not, so there is always a justification for the choice of a particular symbol. Furthermore, it favors English, so sounds of that language are prioritized; obscure languages like French and Swedish get more non-alphanumeric characters. Also bear in mind that this is a product of our own personal needs and tastes, so its main purpose is to be usable by us (i.e., YMMV).

-- LRC & Jagni

(Last update: May 3, 2005)


The charts below are based on those used by IPA (click on a symbol to learn why it was chosen):

Consonants (pulmonic)

Consonants (non-pulmonic)


Other symbols

Diacritics

  Vowels



Suprasegmentals



Tones and word accents



(  ) applied to a diacritic dimish its effect

[  ] can be used as escape signs, to notify the reader that what stands between them is a directive, not phonemes


Consonants (extended)
 
Diacritics (extended)
 
Connected speechVoicing
 
Others (extended)
For Great Justice